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Historical ramblings on various topics having to do with the United Kingdom, Ireland and isles that make up the British Isles. Run by an American university history student studying this topic.

The Thames nocturne of blue and gold
   Changed to a Harmony in grey:
   A barge with ochre-coloured hay
Dropt from the wharf: and chill and cold

The yellow fog came creeping down
   The bridges, till the houses’ walls
   Seemed changed to shadows and St. Paul’s
Loomed like a bubble o’er the town.

Then suddenly arose the clang
   Of waking life; the streets were stirred
   With country waggons: and a bird
Flew to the glistening roofs and sang.

But one pale woman all alone,
   The daylight kissing her wan hair,
   Loitered beneath the gas lamps’ flare,
With lips of flame and heart of stone.

In honor of National Poetry Day, please enjoy this poem from Irishman Oscar Wilde.

(Source: gutenberg.org)

I seemed to have disappeared and reappeared again! 

2014 has be weird to say the least, from the months of post graduation soul and job searching, to finally getting full time work, to currently being unemployed again because the museum I was working at closed; it has been a ride.

So here I am again, hoping I can give this a try. 

So how are you?

The 1928 Winter Olympic Games was played in St. Moritz, Switzerland and featured one British medalist. David Carnegie, who would later become the 11th Earl of Northesk, won bronze in the skeleton. The 1928 games was the first games that skeleton was included as an event, which took place the Cresta Run, argued to be the birthplace of skeleton. Carnegie placed third behind American brothers Jennison and John Heaton. The image is of Carnegie (left) sitting next to gold medalist Jennison Heaton (right) during the games.
Source: 1, 2, image

The 1928 Winter Olympic Games was played in St. Moritz, Switzerland and featured one British medalist. David Carnegie, who would later become the 11th Earl of Northesk, won bronze in the skeleton. The 1928 games was the first games that skeleton was included as an event, which took place the Cresta Run, argued to be the birthplace of skeleton. Carnegie placed third behind American brothers Jennison and John Heaton. The image is of Carnegie (left) sitting next to gold medalist Jennison Heaton (right) during the games.

Source: 12image

The 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamoix, France were the first Winter Olympic Games, and was a very successful game for Great Britain. The ten man Great Britain hockey team took bronze with Canada winning gold and the United States taking silver. Only one member of the team was born in Great Britain, while the other nine were born in Canada. This image is from a match between Great Britain and Canada.
Source: 1, image

The 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamoix, France were the first Winter Olympic Games, and was a very successful game for Great Britain. The ten man Great Britain hockey team took bronze with Canada winning gold and the United States taking silver. Only one member of the team was born in Great Britain, while the other nine were born in Canada. This image is from a match between Great Britain and Canada.

Source: 1image

The 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamoix, France were the first Winter Olympic Games, and was a very successful game for Great Britain. Ethel Muckelt was the only British woman to win a medal in the games, having won bronze in singles figure skating. Ethel had participated in figure skating at the Olympic level in 1920, when figure skating was included in the Summer Olympic Games, before the separation occurred, she had placed fifth. Born in Manchester in 1885, Ethel was almost 40 years old when she won bronze. The first image features Ethel in the middle with Herma Planck-Szabo from Hungary who won gold and Beatrix Loughran from the United States who won silver. The second image is of Ethel with fellow British skater Kathleen Shaw. The striking differences in dress from modern figure skaters and the long skates. 

Source: 1, image 1image 2 

The 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamoix, France were the first Winter Olympic Games, and was a very successful game for Great Britain. A silver medal was won by the four man bobsleigh team. The team consisted of Rodney E. Soher, Alexander Richardson, Ralph H. Broome and Thomas A. Arnold. The team completed the run in 5:48.83. There is an archival video of the bobsleigh event in the 1924 Olympic Games provided by the IOC which can be seen here. The video is not clear enough to distinguish each team, it seems that the shots including the front man wearing the number 4 may be Great Britain; it does feature good shots of the winning Swiss team at the end. The video captures the differences in dress, sleigh, track, and spectators during the first Winter Olympic Games compared to today’s games.
Source: 1, 2, image

The 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamoix, France were the first Winter Olympic Games, and was a very successful game for Great Britain. A silver medal was won by the four man bobsleigh team. The team consisted of Rodney E. Soher, Alexander Richardson, Ralph H. Broome and Thomas A. Arnold. The team completed the run in 5:48.83. There is an archival video of the bobsleigh event in the 1924 Olympic Games provided by the IOC which can be seen here. The video is not clear enough to distinguish each team, it seems that the shots including the front man wearing the number 4 may be Great Britain; it does feature good shots of the winning Swiss team at the end. The video captures the differences in dress, sleigh, track, and spectators during the first Winter Olympic Games compared to today’s games.

Source: 12image

The 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamoix, France were the first Winter Olympic Games, and was a very successful game for Great Britain. A gold medal was won by the men’s curling team which comprised of four Scotsmen, William Jackson, Laurence Jackson, Robin Welsh and Tom Murray. An all Scottish team is fitting as curling has its origins in medieval Scotland. The team beat Sweden and France to claim the gold medal. The medal they had won was only a demonstration medal, in 2002, the families of the men with the help of Glasgow Herald brought the matter to the IOC and they were awarded official medals.

Source: 1image 

If you were around in 2012, you know I love the Olympics and with the Winter Olympic Games starting today I am going to start a (hopefully) steady stream of Olympic posts. Expect winner bios, awesome photos, and other British Isles winter olympic posts!

The Victorian period’s mourning culture is often attributed to Queen Victoria’s 40 year period of mourning, starting in 1861 with the death of her mother early in the year and her husband’s death in December of that year. The impact of mourning on the public can be seen in items marketed for those in bereavement. Advertisements were run in newspapers for mourning clothing, stationary and the like. When Queen Victoria died in 1901, her death created a market for memorial goods, mourning cards being one such item. These examples of such cards come from the Museum of London and are typical of the commemorative goods that would have been sold. These cards include a likeness of her, birth and death dates, and some form of verse or poem dedicated to her memory. The poem from the first example, written by E.M., reads:

          She sweetly sleeps,

The toilful day of life is o’er,

Her boat has crossed the stormy deep,

And anchored by the golden shore,

For her the Crown – for use the loss;

For her the peace – for use the pain;

For her the everlasting gain,

For us the bitter sense of loss,

O hearts with many cares opprest;

O eyes that cannot choose but weep,

God giveth His beloved sleep,

       She sweetly sleeps.

 Source: The Museum of London, Card 1, 2, 3 

I am working on getting together new posts. Would anyone be interested in seeing winter olympics themed posts for the upcoming games like I did during 2012?